Podcast – Legion Strength & Conditioning

Max Recovering
We find that a lot of athletes are doing most of their training in either CrossFit classes or with a small group of “more competitive” friends – and that they’re often trying to figure out how to tack on additional training sessions to what they’re already doing.

There’s been a shift over the last several years in the fitness community towards a better understanding of “training as a stressor.”

This is a fantastic thing, since folks seem to recognize that more is not always better, and training is not helpful if you’re not able to recover from it.

However, this has also led to a industry of recovery tools – often with associated highly mechanistic and scientific-sounding explanations of things like upregulating parasympathetic tone and and influencing the cortisol signaling cascade.

But, do these things actually do anything?

How much does recovery really matter in terms of long-term progress for athletes?

And, can we actually do anything to change our ability to recover?

Check out the full conversation with Luke and Todd to learn:

  • What are the most important variables that impact recovery – and which ones can we actually impact through our actions?
  • Do people really have a genetic ceiling?
  • How to think about volume and intensity in training – and why the “high/low” model from endurance sports is great for CrossFitListen below – or on the podcast player of your choice.

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Show Notes:

  • [00:15] How much do things like saunas, massage guns, supplements, and breathing drills really impact recovery?
  • [06:12] A framework for thinking about recovery: What are the most important variables that impact recovery? Which of these do we have control over? When is it worthwhile to focus on marginal gains?
  • [15:08] Do people really have a genetic ceiling?
  • [19:44] How do we design training programs appropriately relative to someone’s ability to recover?
  • [24:04] What are tangible takeaways for people in terms of thinking about volume and intensity – and how should people design their programs to balance volume and intensity?
  • [31:10] Why the “high/low” model from endurance training is relevant for CrossFitters – and why it helps us find the appropriate level of training stress.

Michael Jacobson Squat Clean
We find that a lot of athletes are doing most of their training in either CrossFit classes or with a small group of “more competitive” friends – and that they’re often trying to figure out how to tack on additional training sessions to what they’re already doing.

For athletes looking to get stronger, this can be tricky since they are often trying to mash together a squatting or weightlifting cycle with a program focused on “CrossFit.”

So, how much additional work should these athletes be doing?
And how much is too much when it comes to adding in additional strength work?

To find answers, we need to understand the concept of “adaptation currency.”

Each athlete has a certain amount of training that they can adapt to in a given week, and they need to spend that “adaptation currency” wisely.

This means prioritizing ruthlessly when adding stuff into your training – especially when you’re already doing a program with a lot of volume.

Check out the full conversation with Jon, Luke and Todd to learn:

  • What are the trade-offs between training with a group (either in classes or with friends) versus focusing only on the most important things for you
  • How to find low-hanging fruit that you can improve with targeted additional training
  • How to structure a week of additional sessions on top of your existing programming

Listen below – or on the podcast player of your choice.

Listen Here

Show Notes:

  • [00:13] What are the trade-offs between doing classes with additional programming vs following a fully individualized program?
  • [10:00] Why training with others can help people who don’t always have the time or energy to train?
  • [15:13] How should athletes think about their priorities in training – especially if they’re already doing a standard CrossFit program in their classes?
  • [25:30] How to think about spending your adaptation currency wisely – and why athletes should focus on low-hanging fruit.
  • [30:34] Some specific recommendations for mapping out a training week and selecting priorities for additional strength work.

You may remember Michele from the 2018 CrossFit Games when she broke her wrist on the first event.

Since then Michele, has gone full-time with her nutrition consulting business Fit Plate Nutrition.

Now Michele isn’t just another athlete on Instagram spouting half-baked nutrition advice. She’s a registered dietitian with a background working in oncology – as well as working one-on-one with a variety of clients looking to look good, feel good, and perform at a high level.

Check out the full conversation with Michele, Jon and Todd to learn:

  • How Michele quit feeling sorry for herself after achieving her long-time goal of qualifying for the CrossFit Games – only to be injured on the first event.
  • What the role of “macros” are for elite athletes, every day athletes, and the folks in between
  • Why being hard on yourself can be counterproductive to long-term progress – and what to do instead if you’re feeling stuck and plateaued

Listen below – or on the podcast player of your choice.

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Check Out More from Michele Here:

Show Notes:

  • [01:22] Michele finally made it to the CrossFit Games in 2018 as an individual athlete – then broke her wrist on the first event. How did she deal with the disappointment?
  • [09:09] How Michele stopped feeling sorry for herself after the 2018 CrossFit Games.
  • [15:09] Michele’s transition from working in marketing for Gatorade to being a dietitian and working in oncology. And, what are the main differences between eating like a “professional athlete” and eating like an “every day athlete?”
  • [26:45] What is the role of tracking for both elite athletes and for every day athletes? And what about for people who are in a “gray area” and are aspiring to be elite athletes?
  • [34:27] How should people balance performance and aesthetic goals in their nutrition?
  • [43:15] Why hard-charging, goal-driven people may not want to “back off” – even though it could be the most beneficial thing for them to do.
  • [51:11] How does Michele work with clients in her practice? And, the importance of focusing on one thing to make long term progress.

Test and retest.

Most people have an understanding that they should be checking in on their numbers by retesting workouts that they’ve done before.

If those numbers are getting better…then great! Progress!

But, if they’re not, then something must be wrong.

In reality, once athletes get past the beginner stage, progress is much lumpier than we think.

Our day-to-day performance varies significantly.

We get stuck on long plateaus where we don’t feel like we’re making any progress.

And we periodically taste a higher level of performance – but then quickly drop back down to our previous level.

While this can be frustrating and psychologically challenging, this is, in fact, par for the course.

Check out the full conversation with Jon, Luke and Todd to learn:

  • Why improved numbers on testing benchmarks don’t always translate into people getting better at the sport
  • The most common psychological traps to avoid during your next testing week
  • What typical patterns of improvement actually look like for elite performers – and why they don’t always get better on testing even if their fitness has improved

Listen below – or on the podcast player of your choice.

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Show Notes:

  • [00:15] While knowing your testing numbers is helpful, being too attached to numbers can have negative consequences. And, beginner, intermediate and advanced athletes all need to think about their numbers differently.
  • [06:32] Even if you improve your strength, your cyclical time trials, and your max unbroken sets of gymnastics movements, you may not actually get better at CrossFit.
  • [11:29] Managing expectations is key to going through testing periods. If athletes think that they’re always supposed to set a new record, they can get themselves into some psychological trouble.
  • [17:16] Performance is more variable than people think – especially amongst folks who aren’t the ones who are always at the top of the leaderboard.
  • [19:13] How often should athletes go through a testing period? How can they manage the psychological aspect of testing?

When figuring out pacing for a workout, there’s a few common ways that athletes calculate what they can expect to accomplish.

The first (and most common) is to pace off of someone else who you know is typically around the same fitness level – maybe plus or minus a few reps or rounds.

The second is to do a round at a moderate effort then adjust the pace up or down from there.

While these are both reasonable strategies and can give an idea of what is realistic, it’s also important to be able to calculate an expected pace from “first principles” so-to-speak.

Doing this is a skill just like any other, and requires knowing a few tricks: how long do certain movements take, how long do transitions typically take, how often can you expect to lift a heavy barbell, and how much can you expect to slow down during a workout?

Check out the full conversation with Jon and Todd to learn:

  • How long common movements take – like wall balls, dumbbell snatches, and burpees
  • How to think about pacing heavy barbells
  • How to factor in rest and fatigue when calculating your paces for workouts

Listen below – or on the podcast player of your choice.

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Show Notes:

  • [00:15] The 2 most common strategies that people use when approaching workouts: pacing off of their own first round and pacing off of someone who tends to be at a similar capacity. How can we use basic rep math to get an outside perspective on how long our rounds should take?
  • [13:10] How do we account for fatigue accumulating as we work? And how do we deal with barbell-based movements like heavy squat cleans when estimating time?
  • [25:09] Cyclical pieces like rowing and biking give us a monitor – but how do we know what paces we should attempt to hold?

Some athletes are able to get pretty good at CrossFit pretty fast.

But, these athletes often find themselves hitting glass ceilings in their performance.

Even though they are able to do most of the gymnastics movements, hit decent weights, and grit through conditioning workouts, they plateau earlier than they think they should.

What’s going on here?

Often, these athletes have skipped steps in their development and are able to compensate their way through training.

To improve long-term, these folks need to be willing to go backwards in their training and rebuild. This can be a huge ego hit, and – to be frank – not everyone is mature enough to do it.

But, if we’re serious about getting better over time, that’s often what we have to do.

Check out the full conversation with Jon, Luke and Todd to learn:

  • The surprising ways that athletes learn to compensate – and it’s not just about mobility and technique
  • Why backing off on conditioning is actually much better for building an engine – and why too much effort is a bad thing
  • The psychology of taking a step backward in order to take two steps forward – and why it’s so hard for us to do

Listen below – or on the podcast player of your choice.

Listen Here

Show Notes:

  • [00:15] Some athletes are able to get pretty good at CrossFit pretty fast. But, what are some surprising ways that these athletes find glass ceilings on their performance?
  • [7:41] People think of “compensation” as a bad thing, but better athletes are often better at compensating. Compensation isn’t just about lifting technique – how do some elite athletes compensate in their conditioning work?
  • [17:41] Why taking a step back threatens athletes’ egos – and why the measurable aspect of CrossFit has a dark side that can have a negative impact on performance.

Pacing is important in just about any workout, but it’s particularly crucial when there’s a heavy barbell looming.

If you don’t have a good understanding of how quickly you can move with different weights in conditioning workouts, and if you don’t understand how long you need to rest between heavier attempts, you can end up getting chewed up pretty badly on these kinds of workouts – even if you’re strong enough to move the weight.

On this episode of the podcast, we go over some key things to think about when pacing yourself on “heavy metcons” (or battery-based workouts), as well as some key things to think about when training to get better at this type of workout.

Check out the full conversation with Jon, Todd and Luke to learn:

  • How to develop the metronome-like pacing that you see elite athletes holding when doing barbell-based conditioning work
  • Why getting stronger works for some athletes to improve their ability to do “heavy metcons” but not others
  • Why being naturally stronger and more powerful can be a detriment to your ability to lift a heavy barbell under fatigue.

Listen below – or on the podcast player of your choice.

Listen Here

Show Notes:

  • [00:15] How to pace for battery workouts or “heavy metcons” – and how to get better at them.
  • [06:53] What do you need to think about to improve your battery? Hint: It’s not just about getting stronger. And, how should people who tend to be more explosive train their battery?
  • [13:15] Why experience is one of the best teachers for pacing in “heavy” workouts – and how to train so that you can learn as much as possible.
  • [20:39] Is there a difference between women and men in ability to do heavy weights in conditioning workouts?
  • [25:16] How do tests of strength usually appear in CrossFit competitions? And – what should people do in their training sessions or in their next “heavy metcon” to get better?

Most people approach their workouts with some sort of plan – but that doesn’t mean that they’re able to execute on it. In this podcast, we are going to go over the main things that athletes need to be thinking about when they’re thinking about how they’re going to split up their reps in workouts.

It’s not as simple as just making a spreadsheet and having a perfect fractioning strategy.

Instead, athletes need to be able to make a plan based upon their current capacity, the interference between movements in the workout, and their expected level of metabolic fatigue. Then, athletes need to be able to adjust on the fly during their session based upon how they’re actually feeling since sticking to a plan that is unraveling is a surefire way to completely fall apart during a workout.

In this podcast, we’re going to break down how to effectively design conditioning workouts so that you can actually get better at doing the things that you struggle with under fatigue.

Check out the full conversation with Jon and Todd to learn:

  • The 3 things that athletes need to consider when making a plan for splitting up their reps in a workout
  • How to use training as an opportunity to learn about your capacity in different scenarios
  • How to find the right balance between sticking to a plan and “pushing through” and calling an audible and adjusting on the fly

Listen below – or on the podcast player of your choice.

Listen Here

Show Notes:

  • [00:17] Most people have some sort of plan going into a workout, but what are the 3 things you should be thinking about when coming up with a strategy?
  • [07:33] The best time to learn what works best for you is during training. Here’s what you need to focus on.
  • [17:10] How does overall metabolic fatigue impact fractioning strategies? And how do you know when you’re going to redline?
  • [21:29] What is the balance between sticking to your plan – and being adaptable and adjusting on the fly?

In this podcast, we’re going to break down how to effectively design conditioning workouts so that you can actually get better at doing the things that you struggle with under fatigue.

We’ve seen a lot of athletes mix this up – either by always doing a bunch of crazy, chaotic stuff in their training, or by only following totally planned out, periodized structures based upon a specific plan for progression over time.

It turns out, they’re not “just metcons.” The way that conditioning work is structured can make a huge difference in terms of how you adapt to it over time.

Especially if you’re not a freakishly talented athlete who can seemingly do just a whole lot of anything and everything and consistently get better.

What should everyone else be doing? If we want to get better at pull-ups in metcons, do we just do a bunch of metcons with pull-ups in them and throw in some additional strict pull-ups?

If we want to get better at heavy squat cleans, do we do a weightlifting cycle and some EMOM weightlifting work?

It’s not always that simple.

Check out the full conversation with Luke, Jon and Todd to learn:

  • The mistake that many athletes make when thinking about training for a competition vs training to get better at something.
  • They key to designing conditioning workouts that are appropriate for your skill level
  • Why some athletes can get better at CrossFit just by doing a strength cycle and focusing on “heavy metcons” – and why that’s a disaster for the wrong kind of athlete.

Listen below – or on the podcast player of your choice.

Listen Here

Show Notes:

  • [00:15] Conditioning workouts can have a different “feeling” and a different stimulus. Your conditioning workouts should have a goal, and shouldn’t be thrown together haphazardly.
  • [04:56] The mistake that many athletes make when thinking about training for a competition vs training to get better at something.
  • [12:03] Training isn’t linear – don’t expect to improve immediately from each training cycle.
  • [18:31] They key to designing conditioning workouts that are appropriate for your skill level
  • [25:25] Why some athletes can get better at CrossFit just by doing a strength cycle and focusing on “heavy metcons” – and why that’s a disaster for the wrong kind of athlete.

As athletes develop in the sport of CrossFit, there’s a few stages of “learning to pace” that they typically go through.

Many folks start off always pushing the intensity – attacking a workout just about as hard as they can, and barely holding on to the finish.

Then, at some point, they typically learn that they should have a plan, pull back on their pace on the assault bike, and understand what their split times are on conditioning pieces.

In this stage, many athletes also become focused on planning out all of their sessions and creating a mental “spreadsheet” of how things are going to go.

While better than having no plan and being totally reckless, the downsides here are that athletes typically become overly rigid and unadaptable – and they struggle when they are unable to stick with their plans.

In the highest order stage of pacing development, athletes are able to formulate a plan, but intuitively understand when to deviate from the plan – either to speed up, slow down, break early, push harder, or go faster than they intended in order to psychologically break a competitor.

Check out the full conversation with Luke and Todd to learn:

  • Why the role of a coach isn’t just to write workouts, but to design scenarios that require athletes to learn about themselves and their effort through the process of training
  • Why the deep intuitive sense of pacing that elite athletes have developed causes them to explain their strategies in ways that can be confusing and inaccurate
  • When an athlete should work on learning to pull back – and when an athlete should work on learning to push harder

Listen below – or on the podcast player of your choice.

Listen Here

Show Notes:

  • [0:15] There’s a standard trajectory that many athletes follow while learning to pace: not having any strategy and going out too hot, then learning to plan and over-planning, then developing an intuition for how to react on the fly based upon how they’re feeling in a workout.
  • [3:52] Workouts are not “just work” – athletes should be trying to learn about their pacing strategy and their reaction to different scenarios (ie splits for each interval of a rowing workout, fractioning strategies for gymnastics, etc)
  • [8:31] Athletes tend to go through a phase of over-calculating pacing. At this stage, attempt to force adaption through strict structure; instead, there needs to be acceptance and understanding of the need to deviate from the ‘spreadsheet’ in certain situations.
  • [12:02] Elite athletes cannot always be trusted when explaining pacing since they have an overdeveloped intuitive capacity to make pacing decisions – and they often don’t even realize that they are using certain strategies.
  • [16:16] Athletes can often learn a lot about their ability to pace by working through very specific pacing scenarios (ie “Row 500m at 1:55 pace, then do 1 clean every 10s for 10 reps”)
  • [20:00] As athletes improve, they will need to increase their paces. Many athletes will settle into a specific range of paces or reps for certain workouts – without realizing that they’ve increased their capacity and need to start to push themselves harder.
  • [25:45] Pacing in a competitive scenario isn’t just about how you feel relative to the workout – it’s about how you feel relative to other competitors around you potentially going a lot faster than you.